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's intelligence service is directly helping the taliban that is killing u.s. soldiers in afghanistan. white house correspondent is at the pentagon tonight with the details. u.s. officials are assessing the damage after the leak of 91,000 classified from january of 2004 to december of 2009. the information released by an antiwar website is described by the military as "secret battlefield reports," which are critical of pakistan intelligence helping the insurgency suggesting that taliban have been equipped with missiles and contain information of civilian casualties. at the white house an effort to say that while there are national security concerns about the massive leak, there is nothing terribly new. >> the content as much as it is their names, their operations, logistics, sources, all of that information out in a public way has the potential to do harm. >> the u.s. has expressed anger at pakistan for allowing al qaeda and taliban to have safe haven on the soil and frustration not not taking the fight to them but the former head of the c.i.a. says the u.s. wanted too much. >> for us to expect th
, she wanted to talk to the president. today shirley sherrod, fired by the u.s.d.a., got the call and another apology. are illegal immigrants raising the crime rate? some argue yes; others no. we'll give you the facts. and happy thursday-- or is it. tracking the mood of america tweet by tweet. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. a tropical storm has just formed in the caribbean and by saturday it could be churning through the site of the massive oil spill in the gulf of mexico, disrupting the cleanup for days, even weeks. some cleanup boats were sent back to port today. the large oil recovery ships may follow. tropical storm bonnie is north of cuba right now, and over the next few days it's projected to pass through the florida keys and then into the gulf. even so, federal officials said today they will keep the cap on that ruptured well. and the white house said the president, who's been urging americans to visit the gulf's still-open beaches, will take the f
case has put a spotlight on the u.s.d.a.'s long history of discrimination against black farmers. more about that now from national correspondent dean reynolds. >> reporter: willie adams '60-acre georgia farm has been in his family since 1938 and he wants to hold on to its red clay and green pastures for generations to come. but the fight to keep it is increasingly stressful. >> high blood pressure, almost a heart attack. (laughs) oh, yeah. a lot of stress. >> reporter: adams is one of a dwindling number of african american farmers, some 33,000 in all. >> we want equal justice! >> reporter: they're hoping congress will at last end decades of discrimination against them and appropriate the $1.25 billion they and their an ancestors won in a settlement with the department of agriculture in february. a court found the farmers had been systematically denied aid solely because they were black. loans, grants, and subsidies that white farmers received. willie adams says u.s.d.a. officials always claimed to him and other blacks that they lacked the funding. but you saw that they did have funds
secret u.s. documents, a whistle blowing website might possess. >>> terrifying drop. the pictures of a toddler falls three stories from an apartment building but amazingly he is okay. >>> chelsea's big day. the former first daughter gets hitched in new york. we have new details about the wedding which are emerging this morning. we're there live for you. >>> the story from behind bars. a new report talks about what life is like in jail for lindsay lohan. good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. welcome to this, the last day of july. >>> developing right now, pakistani officials say more than 800 people have been killed over this past week alone after record-breaking floods in the region. joining me now from london, nbc's tazin ahmed. they're pretty extraordinary. what are you learning? >> reporter: they are extreme conditions, alex. death toll is at least 800 at the moment. those figures are expected to rise. large areas approving to be inaccessible and more rain is expected. now hundreds of thousands have been forced from homes and up to a million according to the u.n. have been aff
each other about a ra barack and david. >> the u.s. has no stronger partner than great britain. >> reporter: but the bp oil leak in the gulf coast test thad alliance. oil giant british petroleum continues to wreak of havoc. >> i completely understand the anger that exists. the oil spill a catastrophe. >> reporter: and growing controversy whether bp had the role in a release of ali muhammad. >> releasing a mass murderer of 270 people, the largest act of terrorism ever committed in the united kingdom, was completely wrong. so in my view, neither should that killer have been given that luxury. that wasn't a decision taken by bp. it was taken by the scottish government. >> reporter: he was convicted in the 1988 pan am 103 bombing over lockerbie scotland that killed 270 people, mostly americans. the scottish government released him on compassionate grounds after doctors said he had terminal prostate cancer and just three months to live. president obama said that was a mistake, and cameron agreed. cameron said he would provide information for a u.s. congressional investigation but di
despite the fact that a u.s. district judge in phoenix stopped some of the most controversial provisions of the bill from taking effect. >> stopping people with probable cause, turning them over to i.c. e. she didn't restroke that. >> reporter: including the portion that included police to revoke immigration status if they think the person they stopped on a crime is in the country illegally. several protesters who were ready to be arrested were stopped. some in new york city staged their own showing of solidarity. >> we have more than appetite for is comprehensive immigration reform. that secures our border and forces our laws, protects our workers, unites our families and has a path to legalization. >> reporter: and despite the well publicized protest, recent polls show that almost half of californians and the majority of americans support the arizona immigration law. rob roth is live with that part of the story. >> reporter: we're in the foothill boulevard overpass, this is where dozens of people are expected to rally in support of arizona immigration bill. if you have already arrived,
officials in effect accused wikileaks and its source within the u.s. military of murder. >> the truth is, they might already have on their hands the blood of some young soldier or that of an afghan family. >> reporter: in what appears to be an attempt to build a criminal case against julian assange, the head of wikileaks, secretary gates asked the director of the f.b.i. to join the investigation. >> the battlefield consequences of the release of these documents are potentially severe and dangerous for our troops, our allies, and afghan partners. >> reporter: the documents reveal the names of afghans who provided intelligence to the u.s. their lives are now in danger. and their exposure will send a chill through anyone else thinking of helping >> will people whose lives are on the line trust us to keep their identity secret? >> reporter: the documents also provide a road map to the american military's tactics. this, for instance, is a moment-by-moment log of what u.s. troops did after specialist bowe bergdahl was captured by the taliban. the damage could get worse. >> it could be a substa
know, the high octane british prime minister, david cameron, arrived for his first u.s. visit since taking office in early may. and we had a chance to interview him. cameron and obama, both in their 40s, both with young children. but cameron is a conservative, and on this day, we learned bp is selling $7 billion in assets to another oil company, the apache corporation, to generate cash for the costs of the oil spill. cameron has been worried that the unrelenting u.s. pressure on the company could affect the stockholders on both sides of the ocean. are you as angry about what happened in the gulf as americans are? >> yes, i was very angry about it, because anyone who cares about the environment, when you see those pictures of oil pouring out of an underground well and doing so much environmental damage, doing so much damage to wildlife, to beaches, to livelihood, that makes you angry. and i want bp to sort it out. i do think it's in britain's interest and also america's interest, and the world's interest, that bp remains a strong and stable company, not only so it's able to make thos
is needed to stop illegals and smugglers from flooding across the u.s./mexico border. but as bill whitaker reports, the border region is not the lawless territory many believe it is. >> the border is more secure now than it's ever been. >> reporter: murder, burglaries, rape, the major crimes, up or down on the border? >> they're down. >> reporter: down? >> violence in the cities is down. >> reporter: according to the fbi, that's true across the southern border this decade. in san diego, violent crime is down 17%. in phoenix, down 10%. el paso, texas, one of the safest cities in the u.s., violent crime down 36%. and it sits right across from juarez, mexico, one of the deadliest cities on earth. west along the border in nogales, arizona -- >> this is a very safe environment. >> reporter: chris, a third generation produce distributor says it's as safe as 20 years ago. one reason? >> we're definitely seeing more border patrol over the last few years. >> reporter: border patrol chief is in charge of the 262-mile tucson sector that covers nogales. 338 agents patrol today, up from a decade ago. w
, build its reputation back in the u.s. >> jim, how significant is it that bp is naming an american to head the company? >> reporter: i think it's very significant, bob dudley's been around for a very long time. he was at amoco, if you recall amoco was taken over by bp in a merger in 1998. he went to -- grew up in mississippi so he knows that region very well. he has been in the gulf on and off during this whole oil spill. went to smu, university of illinois. so he is very much well known in the u.s. and they are hoping that as this first non-british ceo that he can repair bp's damage. he's got a on in his hands, as you say. they are setting aside $32.5 billion to clean up the oil spill. there will probably need to be more money as well. there is the issue of selling more than $30 billion worth of u.s. assets. that will be one of the many things on bob dudley's plate. >> jim boulden in london, thank you so much. >>> in 25 minutes we'll get a never-before-seen interview with outgoing ceo tony hayward, conducted in the early days of the disaster in the gulf. david matti intingly is pr
it keeps money flowing into the u.s. economy. why would they want to add to the debt when they still have lots of money that still hasn't been earmarked for anything? >> i can't answer that directly but i can say that speaker pelosi -- speaker pelosi, president obama and senator reid thinks spend more money, that's the best way to create jobs, spend more money, extend jobless benefits, they say that's a way of creating jobs. many economists say that's not correct. we're getting earnings reports from the financial companies, the economy, the recovery, has stalled, that you can say for sure. secondly, this extension of unemployment benefits will definitely add to the overall decifit. $34 billion. because we've got to borrow this money. if you look at the debt clock, that means that by the end of this day or by early tomorrow morning, top left, there you go, we've crossed $13.2 trillion. we'll be at 13.22 by the end of tomorrow or early into thursday morning. we're adding to the decifit. you can definitely say that. martha: i mentioned, we all remember not too long ago, they passed pay go wh
of reverse racism at the u.s. department of agriculture, as with newshour political editor david chalian, the administration apologizes to a fired employee. >> lehrer: plus, a tom bearden oil spill report on the dispute over how to block the flow of oil into threatened tidal estuaries in louisiana. >> woodruff: and, on this 60th anniversary of north korea's attack on the south, jeffrey brown revisits that first hot conflict of the cold war, and explores its continuing legacy with warren wiedhahn, a u.s. marine veteran of the war, plus historians michael beschloss and alex roland. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the campaign to toughen financi
some portions of a confidential study of conditions before the rig disaster. also, was the u.s. duped by an iranian scientist who may have been working as a double agent? i'll talk about that and a lot more with the former cia insider. the outed operative valerie plame wilson. >>> an openly gay soldier and outspoken critic of the don't ask don't tell policy has revealed today he's been formally discharged from the united states army. lieutenant dan choy, a west point grad, was arrested for handcuffing himself to a gate in protest of banning gays from the military. i'm sure that lieutenant choy knew this was coming. he had been removed for some time. only a matter of time before he was formally discharged, i assume. >> reporter: yeah, wolf. we spoke with lieutenant choy this afternoon, and he knew it was coming, but he told us, quote, you know, you prepare yourself. he said i had built up an armor, but it's still an emotional roller coaster. now, lieutenant choi says he just got a phone call today from his battalion commander letting him know about the discharge, but, you know, when i
owns "u.s. news & world report" and recently wrote the hope that fired up the election of barack obama has flickered out, leaving a national mood of despair and disappointment. the fundamental problem is starkly simple. jobs and the deepening fear among the public that the american dream is vanishing before their eyes. i was joined earlier from new york by mort zuckerman and steve forbes, chairman and ceo of forbes, incorporated. gentlemen, thank you both very much. i can't think of two better people to talk about the business climate right now. so let me just start by quoting ben bernanke, the chairman of the fed, as you well know, who called the state of the economy unusually uncertain. so i'd like to ask the two of you to give me your description of where you think the economy is right now. mr. zuckerman? >> well, i'm more or less on the pessimistic side of things. my view is that you have consumer spending, which is either flat or going down, housing, which is falling off the edge of the cliff, employment, which is still continuing to be a serious problem, and i could give you a wh
the u.s. military of murder. here's the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mike mullen. >> i think we always need to be mindful of the unknown potential for damage in any particular document that we handle. mr. assange can say whatever he likes about the greater good he thinks he and his source are doing, but the truth is they might already have on their hands the blood of some young soldier or that of an afghan family. >> wikileaks' founder refuses to say how his site got the documents. but nothing is secret on the internet. the military may have a hacker, a convicted criminal from california, to thank for cracking this case. his name is adran lamo, just 29 years old. in 2004 he was convicted of breaking into "the new york times," microsoft and lexus nexus computers. he went to the federal government to show the leaking. the website might also face chinl charges. barbara starr has the latest developments in our next hour. >>> so where's all the spilled oil? the coast guard insists it can't find much more to clean up on the surface of the gulf. their crews keep conducting fly
spill operations. former u.s. attorney general alberto gonzalez will not be charged in the firings of nine u.s. attorneys under the bush administration. after a 22 month investigation, the justice department ruled there's insufficient evidence to establish that he and his staff made misleading statements. this was not criminal. if they were political, that was not the crime. gonzalez resigned after that controversy. ineptitude and confusion, that's how they are describing officials at massy energy in the months before the explosion at a west virginia mine. that killed 29 men. they are all part of a rebuttal to massy's claim that the government forced them to make changes to reduce the volume of fresh air in the mine before the blast. the company's conduct is under federal investigation. secretary of state hillary clinton is in hanoi, vietnam this morning. she's attending an asian summit meeting where the buzz is the new sanctions she's announced against north korea. the north koreans responded by declaring the u.s. should drop the sanctions and cancel next week's military maneuvers
in that gulf of mexico. and getting started may be the toughest part of the job. while onboard the u.s. coast guard "elm," cnn's rob marciano shows us how difficult it is. >> reporter: once the barge was in place, we had to lash the two vessels together. trying to tighten up this slack here. >> slack out. >> no, no, no. >> don't know if i'm helping but they need to make this as tight as possible. i can feel the tug pulling against me. >> we're about as good as we're going to get there. >> reporter: just doing that for 20 seconds. i'm exhausted, bro. we haven't even started. this whole process has taken hours. i mean, we're almost at -- into the arch and we haven't skimmed a thing or even deployed any sort of skimming equipment. it's given me a -- a real appreciation for what these guys are doing every day. you think -- you just come out here, you drop some boom and throw a vacuum cleaner on it and suck up the oil. there's so much more to it when you're talking about a project of this scope and a mess this big that needs to be cleaned up. it's painstakingly slow. the whole thing is slow, for s
plant and a gm plant and here is what he had to say. >> you now have all those u.s. auto companies showing a profit. they've rehired 55,000 workers. >> reporter: and, alex, of course the president this week, he has more fund-raising on the schedule coming up. he's going to be going to atlanta. he's going to be going to chicago. he'll be making speeches around that. the focus from here on out to november is going to be the economy. the president hammering home the fact that he's taken some unpopular steps that are bearing fruit. a lot of republicans are saying, look at the scoreboard, mr. president, 9.5% unemployment, slow gdp growth, where are the grounds and that is where this election battle will be fought. >> yeah. just a little glitch there but you handled that very well. just got a little -- >> reporter: interesting. >> no worries. got you covered. >>> president obama says he's concerned about the ethics charges facing congressman charlie rangel. rangel denies the 13 charges, which include tax and disclosur. perhaps september, right at the election season gears up. >>> firefig
into a history of discrimination by the u.s. agriculture department. and money owed to black farmers. >>> and a former republican senator may be out to get michael steele. i'll ask norm coleman if he is serious about a possible challenge for his party's top job. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> up first, a failed flaw aboard the deepwater horizon rig when it exploded and unleashed the worst oil disaster in u.s. history. we're just now learning that an alarm system, get this, had intentionally been disabled for about a year before the april 20th blast that killed 11 workers. the platform's chief electronics technician testified today before a federal panel. he explained that the rig's fire and gas sensors were active but its computer system was inhibited in his word so it wouldn't trigger any kind of general alarm or an automatic engine shutdown. listen to this. >> when i discovered it was inhibited about a year ago i inquired as to why it was inhibited. and the explanation i got was that from the oim down they did not want people woke up at 3:00 in the morning du
. bill: we are digging deeper, one of the top secret u.s. intelligence community, "the washington post" focusing on the intelligence business that's hidden in suburbs across america. this is a 3-part series. it has gotten so much attention. today's point is about the impact we've never seen. chris stierwalt, good morning to you. we had guests breathing fire on this story on day one, on monday. it seems to have ebbed since it is day three of the series. what's new today? >> what's new today, i guess you'd say more of the same but what the post is going to, these great lengths, and i mean lengths, to talk about is how big and complex america's sort of intelligence system is, where you're talking about the hundreds of thousands of people with top security clearance, or top secret clearance, you're talking about nestled in strip malls across the country contractors who are doing the work of filtering through the intelligence that's designed to seep us safe. bill: if there was a timing in the question, general clapper is director of national intelligence, some hearings set to begin this wee
and universities in the u.s. one of those schools, quinnipiac is the defendant in a lawsuit. you see, in an effort to save money, they dropped several varsity sports including women's volleyball. they require equality between male and female athletes so they replaced it with competitive cheer. the judge wrote competitive cheer may sometime in the future qualify. today, however, the activity is too under developed and disorganized to be treated as offering genuine varsity athletic participation for students. nina is an attorney at the national women's law center. >> schools want to cut costs, that's understandable and unfortunately sports are on the chopping block, they can't cut costs on the backs of women. >> reporter: bond says at maryland, female athletes get respect. >> we are in the weight room, we are tutoring sport services, sports medicine, we have access to beautiful facilities and everything we need to compete and compete strong. >> reporter: now, this judge looked at things like who the cheer squads compete against and how they recruit. at maryland there are competitive cheer scholarshi
to widespread racial profiling by arizona law enforcement officers. they worry it will lead to harassment of u.s. citizens and of legal residents of the united states because of the way they look or the language they speak. the second lawsuit being heard in the afternoon is by the obama administration the basic premise of that lawsuit is that they say the federal government not states has the exclusive authority to regulate immigration law. they say the state of arizona has no legitimate interest in passing a law regulating immigration. arizona governor jan brewer filed a response to those lawsuits. she says the state will suffer irreparable harm if this law is not allowed to go into effect. because she says the federal government has not done its job in terms of securing the border and controlling rampant smuggling that continues to plague the state of arizona. we spoke to homeland security secretary janet napolitano, the former governor of arizona and the woman responsible for u.s. border security. she says that she understands the frustrations of arizona residents but she says this law is mis
sherrod, a georgia-based official with the u.s. department of agriculture and obama administration appointee, at a naacp dinner in march of this year describing her initial reluctance to help a white farmer who came for aid. >> i was struggling with the fact that so many black people had lost their farmland, and here i was faced with having to help a white person save their land. so i didn't give him the full force of what i could do. >> reporter: sherrod says the incident she was describing occurred more than 20 years ago, before she worked for the usda, a story she told as an example of overcoming her own prejudices. >> that's when it was revealed to me that it's about poor versus the people who have. >> and telling that story, how i changed while working with him, i used that to help others to see it's not about race. >> reporter: but the reaction was swift and certain. the usda asked her to resign. sherrod said she was driving when she got the call from an agriculture official in washington. >> she said, well, they want you to pull over to the side of the road and submit your r
legal showdown over arizona's tough new immigration law. the u.s. justice department is trying to block the new law before it goes into effect next week. today was their first day in court. our own lee cowan is in phoenix covering. lee, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. most people think the federal government does have a pretty good case here. the problem may be the timing. how do you ask a federal judge to quash a state statute even before it goes into effect? arizona today was arguing, at least give us a chance to prove ourselves first. [ chanting ] >> reporter: with just one week to go before arizona's new immigration law is scheduled to take effect, the protests outside the federal courthouse in phoenix today were louder than ever, on both sides of the debate. >> the law is black and white. you're either breaking the law or not. >> reporter: inside, the federal government was asking a judge to block the law, arguing arizona can't establish its own immigration policy, largely, it says, because it may interfere with federal enforcement of the nation's immigration laws.
. >> reporter: cameron opposed the release a year ago inherited a mess complicating the british-u.s. relations on terrorism and the oil spill. >> releasing the lockerbie bomber, mass murder of 270 people, largest act of terrorism ever committed in the united kingdom was completely wrong. >> cameron tried to fence off british oil giant b.p. from al-megrahi's release despite the revelations the company lobbied for release of prisoners to secure drilling rights off the coast. >> it wasn't a decision taken by b.p., it was taken by the scottish government. >> b.p. says it never lobbied specifically for the al-megrahi's release. lawmaker lawmakers like senator bob menendez don't buy it, citing revelation about documents linking b.p., former intelligence officer and jack straw, from brown's recently ousted government. >> very revealing and questions whether b.p. was willing to do anything they could to get a prisoner transfer release to strike oil deal on the lives of americans and others who perished on pan am 103. >> they call for review of available evidence. both have little recourse to challenge
in afghanistan, now getting word that one of the u.s. service members is dead, and the other being held by the taliban. we will continue to have more on the breaking story. for now, time to say good-bye. thank you for being here. candy crowley, it's all yours. >>> not much time for democrats to turn around what may be a rough election day focused on one issue, the economy. the unemployment rate was 6.9% when president obama was elected. 18 months ago, his administration released a report saying if congress passed a stimulus plan unemployment would stay below 8%. congress did pass that stimulus bill. unemployment is now 9.5%, and 14 million americans out of work. friday, the white house projected the jobless rate will remain above 9% until 2012. >>> americans are feeling the pain. only 22% say the economic conditions are good, and 78% say they are poor. for democrats, the numbers do not add up to a promising november. today, unemployment and a recovery that doesn't feel like one, with business leaders mort zuckerman and steve forbes. >> unless the president deals credibly with the uncert
in the courts and on the streets? also more than 100 days of disaster. the worst spill in u.s. history marks a milestone. and we're asking the tough questions about how and why so much oil seems to have vanished. >>> and art in the white house from every angle. join me on a fascinating tour of historic paintings, antiques and did he cure that presidents get to see and enjoy every day. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. wolf blitzer is off. i'm suzanne malveaux and you're in "the situation room." >>> arizona's controversial immigration law went into effect as scheduled this week. minus key provisions blocked by federal judge. now no one in the state seems satisfied. governor jan brewer quickly launched an appeal of the ruling. and opponents of the crackdown launched a series of street protests leading to a number of arrests. both sides are preparing for the next round of the legal fight. i spoke with cnn's senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin about the ruling by u.s. district judge susan bolton which focused on the most controversial elements of the law. jeff, we
. the issue is, this administration is spending a better part of three days on a u.s. department of agriculture official when our country is hurting and desperate for work and desperate for prosperity. america sinking and we are talking about. this. >> bill: they would rather give -- and you have major garrett and james rosen, they want to get rid of this. so it's the media driving this story. the president called her. if the white house didn't have anything do-to-do this why did the president call her? >> because it was a classy thick to do. if i were the president we would have called her. cnn has her tied up. >> she thinks fox is racist. you don't want to say that i'm going to say that she believes fox is racist. >> bill: fine, i would still like to talk to the woman in person. now, if you believe that because she is a far-left person who is very committed to those views. she shouldn't be working, at the federal level doing the people's business? >> because you are supposed to represent all of america this is not to be a racial spoil system. >> anybody in the bush administrati
in kenya or indonesia and didn't have a legitimate u.s. birth certificate, the birther conspiracy, of course. in order to debunk that one, the obama campaign went on the offense in a big way and launched a website called fightthesmears.com. it had a whole page dedicated to debunking the birther conspiracy and detailed the actual facts about mr. obama's citizenship complete with his certification of live birth. but the obama campaign wasn't satisfied with just debunking, with just answering the birther smear or the whitey smear. their strategy was about more than that. it was about naming and shaming the people behind those smears. fightthesmears.com had a whole page dedicated to exposing the perpetrators of these smears, basically an interactive map listing various right wing groups, republican political operatives, even previous smears these individuals had been involved in. the strategy was not only to discredit the smear but also the smearer. here's how a campaign spokesman summed it up at the time. he said, quote, the obama campaign isn't going to let dishonest smears spread a
? >> they allowed the prisoner transfer agreement. >> it is not case closed. >> u.s. lawmakers say we may get some answers after all. plus one passenger says the plane just dropped right out of the sky. >> i saw at least two people hit the ceiling. drinks were flying. >> tonight, terror at 30,000 feet. >> and what the bleep? blago gave us his word. >> i want to promise the people of illinois i'm going to testify. when i testify, which i will, and i can't wait to testify to set the record straight. >> but tonight, a bombshell on planet blago. >> the biggest lesson i've learned is that i talk too much. >> who taught him that? >> governor -- >> and how will he clear his name now? but first from fox this wednesday night, the white house apologizing to the african-american woman who says she was forced to resign from her job at the department of agriculture after a comment she made appeared on the internet. on a web site that posted an edited video with her comments about race taken out of context and leading to what the white house is now calling an injustice. she is shirley sherrod. she gave a
and destroy the mood for nuclear talks. the warning comes just hours before u.n. and u.s. officials meet with both north korea and south korea over the sinking of a warship back in march. international investigators now say the north was behind those attacks that killed 46 sailors, pyongyang denies it. just about any criminal can steal a car but a former g.m. employee is accused of stealing something much more valuable. car secrets. the engineer and her husband pleading not guilty today to accusations they tried to steal information about the company's hybrid cars. prosecutors say the couple copied thousands of documents on hybrids so that they could sell the information to g.m.'s competitors in china. that's where the real trouble comes in because in the words of the fbi's boss in detroit. theft of trade secrets is a threat to national security. g.m. reportedly stems the value of the stolen documents at 40 million bucks. the suspect is free on bond, at least for now. well, there are new details tonight about alvin greene. he is the once surprised democratic candidate for south carolina'
cultivation. >> all that debate may be moot. if the federal government decides to step in and the u.s. supre court ruled five years ago that local and sta laws are changing. federal law is still federal law. >>> the suspect involved a gun battle with chp on interstate 580 is expected to enter a plea to attempted murder charges in court in the next coue of hours. meantime, police say theyheir confrontation with byron will qams may have prevented a bigger problem and they know who he was targetin >> this morning, byron williams has yet to take the stand and enter a ea. a sheriff's deputy to me they still have to interview him and try to of before the judge as quickly as possible. he has medical issues. those e the gunshot wounds he suffered during the mass shootout. >> you can hear some of the shots from the intense 12 minute gun battle that took place between chp officers early sunday morning on 580 in oakland. the suspect byron williams has told investigators he hoped to start a receiver lies by traveling to san francisco and killing people of importance at the aclu and tides foundatio that
to pay fines to the u.s. government for violating the clean water act and that may be as high as $18 billion and that would be in addition to the $32 billion. >> it's almost impossible to look past what happened in the gulf but what's odd about this is when you get beyond the oil spill, bp is actually, from what i understand, performing fairly well. >> that $17 billion, that is a huge number, but revenue actually increased almost 30% to more than $10 billion in the second quarter for bp. we've been talking about a lot this earning season, revenue growth is really what a lot of investors whant to see from any big company and if it weren't for all these cleanup costs, they would have posted a profit of about $5 billion, even more than it made this time last year. still, the main concern, beyond the bottom line, is the company's reputation and while some may see tony hayward as a sacrificial lamb, they'rages not getting rid of him. they're moving him to a very big, lucrative operation in russia. about one-quarter of the company's gas and oil production happens in the united states, so g
wrongly fired by the u.s.d.a. >> without a doubt, ms. sherrod is owed an apology. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, small towns, huge salaries. outrage in california where the city manager makes nearly twice as much as the president of the united states. it's a reenactment, but investigators say this is what happens when a north korean torpedo struck a south korean warship. and he's no houdini, but he did turn a cell phone into a porsche. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it was an extraordinary scene on national television today. the president's top spokesman admitting the administration had fired an official of the agriculture department for alleged racism without knowing all the facts. and then he offered her an apology. but it didn't stop there. the man who fired shirley sherrod, agriculture secretary tom vilsack, soon popped up on t.v. himself and offered her another job. all this while the nation watched her watch them. we begin tonight with jan cr
're adopting calls for handing over security to the afghan government by the end of 2014. clinton says the u.s. and the world is with afghanistan despite the fact that troop withdrawals are now scheduled to begin next year. >>> los angeles district attorney is looking into the business practices of goldline international. it is a popular company that sells gold items on tv and online. reports now of complaints by customers saying they were either lied to or misled or pressured into buying gold coins not worth what they originally thought. among the company's pitchmen, glenn beck, mike huckabee and fred thompson. congress is also looking into the case. >>> a ufo sighting over china caused panic, confusion and lots of speculation as to what it could be. it shut down an airport in southeastern china for about an hour. local reports say it didn't show up on the radar. a source tells "china daily" it may be part of military exercises. certainly almost does look like a rocket of some sort. the government would just say that an investigation is ongoing. >> isn't that what they always say when you see
$309 a week. now, let me give you a sense of the states in the u.s. that still have double digit unemployment. there are a number of states that have 39 states and the district of columbia in the latest report, which has just come out today, actually saw decreases in their unemployment, but there are still ten states that have unemployment rates above 10%. california, florida, illinois, michigan, mississippi, nevada, ohio, oregon, rhode island and south carolina. many of these states have manufacturing facilities, others have unemployment rates that are higher for other reasons. now, take a look at the number of states that have more than 100,000 people who have exhausted all federal and state unemployment benefits. that means they are long-term unemployed, and they cannot -- they cannot get anymore benefits. california, texas, florida, georgia, illinois, michigan, ohio, new york and pennsylvania. a lot of overlap between those two states. now, why is this vote happening again at 2:30 eastern today? because the democrats think they'll have the votes to actually get it passed. and
will be determined by regulators. the bill gives more power to some regulators. some of the same ones that failed u.s. last time around. why should we be confident they'll get it right? >> excellent question. the theory, the basic strategy in the reform bill does not rest on the wisdom of regulators. it does two important things. it will help consumers make better choices. with better disclosure. much more clarity about the terms of the credit card contract or mortgage loan. they get better protection against the risk of being taken advantage of. it also gives authority we did not have to put in place strong constraints on risk taking on all the nation's largest institutions. that did not exist before. >> would these powers have allowed you, if you were treasury secretary at the time, or your predecessor to have staved off the crisis? >> i don't think any reform bill no law in any country that can prevent all crises. if he had this, we would have been able to limit risk taking. it would have caused much less damage, would have been much less severe. >> you alluded to the consumer financial protection
the rhetoric. in every large movement, 145 million people in the u.s., there is always a fringe. so, that doesn't represent the movement at large. >> the tea party caucus is non-partisan, but no democrats or independents turned out for the meeting today. most republicans who did show up have been the tea party fans for months. while the new caucus may give the tea party access to lawmakers, the fact is that it was created today. that proves lawmakers were already listening, bret. >> bret: all right, carl. thank you. on day 93 of the gulf oil disaster, there is concern that rainstorms moving toward the area more force a shutdown of efforts to seal the reptured well. engineers say they relief well might be, might reach b.p.'s broken well by the weekend. but an evacuation because of that storm system could delay that by a couple of weeks. also today, the times of london report b.p. ceo tony hayward will step down by early september. the company, though, says hayward still has the support of the board of directors. president obama today signed a sweeping overhaul of financial industry regulations t
it comes to civilian deaths. wikileaks has published what it says are nearly 92,000 official u.s. documents of raw data on the deaths and casualties collected over the past six years. julie, the founder of the website, calls it, quote, the total history of the afghan war from 2001 until now. 2010. she claims the documents reveal firsthand accounts of small incidents that have added up to huge numbers of dead civilians. cnn has not connirmd authenticity or the documents which supposedly come from both u.s. military and diplomatic sources. it's provoked an angry response from the obama administration. and general james jones says publishing the document was irresponsible and could put lives at risk and threaten national security. the documents were released tonight on the internet but "the new york times" has had access to them for weeks. their own reporting strongly suggests what many in the u.s. military have long suspected. the taliban are getting intelligence and assistance from pakistan. i'm joined by telephone by chris jivers. what have you found as you pour over these sghoumts. >> the
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